Monday, August 19, 2013

Everything's Coming Up Rosie

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
These cookies have been almost 5 months in the making.  OK...not in the *actual* making, but in the mental making.  You see, my sister had a little girl in April (this is her 4th baby...the first 3, boys).
Her name is Rosie. ♥ 

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Thinking about cookies for Rosie, I knew I wanted to do roses (was that obvious?), so months ago, I bought some silicone rose molds by Martha Stewart.  Ah, Martha.

{Now, these are made for clay, but I used them with fondant.  Silicone is used for all kinds of cooking applications...and I can't find anything about specific "food-grade" silicone, but found this, "as a low-taint, non-toxic material, silicone can be used where contact with food is required."  And, the fondant is touching the silicone for about 2 seconds.  In other words, I think it's ok.}

Alright, disclaimer over.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Ever since Rosie was born, my sister Molly and I have been debating the big issues.  Like, do we think pink roses are prettier on a blue or yellow background?  I still don't know.  

Originally, I thought the background for the cookies would be gingham, but (a.) painting diagonals is not one of my gifts, and (b.) they ended up looking more like lattice...which I liked.  They remind me of vintage lattice work.  I should just say I planned it that way. ;)
rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog

To make these Rosie cookies, you'll need:

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Use a #2 tip to outline the cookies in yellow, pink, and blue

Thin the icings with water, a bit at a time, stirring with a silicone spatula, until it is the consistency of a thick syrup.  (Reserve some of the white icing for piping details later.) You'll want to drop a "ribbon" of icing back into the bowl and have it disappear in a count of "one thousand one, one thousand two." Four is too thick, one is too thin.  Count of 2-3 is good.  Cover with a damp dishcloth and let sit for several minutes.

Stir gently with a silicone spatula to pop and large air bubbles that have formed.  Pour into squeeze bottles.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Fill in the outlines with the thinned icing, using a toothpick to guide to the edges and to pop large air bubbles.

Let the cookies dry, uncovered, 6-8 hours or overnight.

While the cookies are drying, make the roses. 

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Dust the insides of the molds with cornstarch.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Press the tinted fondant into the mold (it helps to dust your hands with cornstarch, too).  Roll over the back of the mold with a small rolling pin.  I used the handle of a pastry cutter.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Flip the mold over and gently pry it off of the fondant.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Use a paring knife (I eventually started using an X-acto knife) to cut away the excess.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Make some leaves, too.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
{I couldn't stop staring at them.}

The next day, add the lattice or gingham to the dried icing. (If you want to see REAL gingham on cookies, check out Glorious Treats.)

Mix equal parts food coloring and water.  Dip a flat paintbrush into the mixture, then blot off the excess.  I used a different yellow for the painting than I did for the icing.  The egg yellow as a paint was reading too "school bus."  I switched it up for Lemon Yellow.  (You can see the difference on those napkins in the picture.)
rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Paint on diagonal lines (hopefully better than I did).

Use a small paintbrush and paint along the edges of the fondant roses with the pink "paint" to add some dimension.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Use royal icing to attach the roses and leaves to the cookies.

I know, it seems like a lot of steps, but honestly, they're pretty easy.  As a matter of fact, I want to stick those roses onto every cookie I make from this point forward.

rosie cookies tutorial ::: bake at 350 blog
Rosie....we're so happy you are here!!!  
Thanks for bringing roses, hair bows, ruffles, tutus, and PINK into our lives! ♥



Online Cake Decorating Class

37 comments:

  1. We just got a new little girl also named...Rosie! My 6 year old daughter's first kitty, and she named her Rosie Papaya. DOB 5-17. She's a 3 lb teacup bundle of fluff and mischief! :)

    These cookies are a work of art, Bridget! As are all your cookies. Congrats to your sister on her Rosie!

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  2. These are absolute cuties.. love the diagonal lines.

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  3. These are so so gorgeous! And I bet you are the sweetest Auntie that ever was!

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  4. These are beautiful! You are going to be the best aunt. Rosie will want to be making cookies at your house all the time!

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  5. These are real stunners, Bridget! Congratulations to your sister on her little Rosie!
    Renee - Kudos Kitchen

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  6. I LOVE these cookies!!! Everything about them!!! You rock my world yet again amazing Bridget!!! Any chance we can get a picture of Rosie too??? :)

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  7. I love these so much! Gorgeous colors and beautiful design! Thanks for the link too! =)

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  8. Absolutely STUNNING! Painting the edges of the roses is a genius final touch that puts them over-the-top!!!

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  9. Those are the most beautiful cookies I have ever seen! You have outdone yourself!

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  10. Gorgeous cookies, Bridget! I love the look with the roses, like they're climbing on the lattice.

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  11. Simply stunning! Every Monday should come with rose cookies:)

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  12. These cookies are lovely and seem fitting for a lovely little Rosie! I like the doily background, too!

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  13. Good grief! I feel inadequate enough without seeing these awesomely beautiful cookies. Stop tormenting me!

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  14. aww these cookies are so sweet! :)

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  15. Beautiful rosie cookies, girl! Love, love, love the vintage vibe on these beauties...the rose shapes, the leaves and the pretty gingham or lattice look. Adorbs! So sweet to do for your sister's new little baby girl. Presh! I, too, struggle with silicone when using with food to be consumed. So much is written on the other side with regard to safety (the non-safe side). Ugh. Thanks for sharing. Again, so sweet! Pinning!

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  16. Bridget- I have NEVER in my life seen anyone make cookies like you do. They are all AMAZING and make me want to nibble at one just for the pure pleasure of it...except they are too pretty to eat! You are a true artist! xo Diana

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  17. These are the sweetest cookies! And my gosh, you would be the all the time sweetest Anut ever. Rosie is so lucky!

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  18. I LOVE THESE!!! What a great idea painting the "lattice" on the cookies. They are so very shabby chic!

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  19. These are almost too pretty to eat!

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  20. What a great way to celebrate the arrival of a new little girl. I love how vibrant these are! I also love how you used the silicone molds -- what a great idea!

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  21. I just love these large frame cookie cutters and what you created here is just adorable. Much like your sweet niece Rosie I have no doubt :)

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  22. Ummmm. You are AHHHH-MAAAAZZZ-IIIINGGGGGGGG!

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  23. These cookies are darling and you're such a nice Aunt. Little Rosie will love these and cherish them forever I'm sure. She will always remember the special cookies you make for her - especially since they're made with love.

    Great tutorial.

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  24. LOVE these cookies! The little rose is such a great way to dress up the lattice (you could totally get away with saying that's the look you were going for- it is awesome!).
    A note for using the molds- I also use silicone molds for fondant decorations (as you said, it's only in there for seconds at a time, and covered with cornstarch anyway- no risk IMO). Anyway- what I do, rather than using so much and cutting away the excess is determine- usually only takes a time or two- how much fondant is just enough to fill the mold- press the fondant in and then flex to release. This saves the cutting out step, letting you get back to your cookies faster! :)
    Happy baking!

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  25. Oh Bridget...these cookies are stunning!! The colors & my favorite gingham pattern. So HAPPY!

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  26. Love the use of molds, makes me think I might actually be able to do this. Lol.

    Did you end up using the small flowers for anything? They are super cute.

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  27. I love the design of the cookies but what really gets me is the overall design. Love the bubbly edges on the pics!

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  28. These are truly beautiful, thank you for sharing this! I absolutely love the how all the colors come together!

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  29. So pretty..definitely yellow wins over blue! I've never used the silicone molds, but I would love to try with these beautiful roses. Congratulations on your new niece!

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  30. These are jaw-droppingly beautiful!

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  31. Congrats on your new niece! These are just stunning!!

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  32. I just love these cookies, they are so pretty! Rosie is lucky to have an Auntie like you!

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  33. These are so pretty and neat! lovely.

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  34. Now these are great presentation you got here. Cheers!

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  35. Oh, so I saw the photos before I read your post and thought to myself "Wow, these cookies would be perfect for my great niece's 4th birthday next month." Her name? Rosie of course!

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Thank you so much for taking the time to comment! Happy baking! :)
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