Thursday, April 4, 2013

How-to Texas Cookies : part one

Here's one thing I learned about making Texas-themed cookies: people not from Texas don't necessarily know about bluebonnets.  They do, however, know about armadillos.
 photo Texassetarmadillomiddle.jpg
So, when Jim (don't you love how I throw that out there like it happens everyday?) wanted Texas cookies for his party, he kind of gave me carte blanche as far as the designs went.  My mind raced.  Even though there would be several different designs, I wanted them to coordinate somehow, so I went with a black outline.

texas bluebonnets and map photo texasbluebonnetsandmap.jpg
I love a black outline for several reasons. 1.) It really makes colors POP.  2.) I think it brings out the whimsical and fun in cookies. 3.) It's an easy way to coordinate a set of cookies that don't have other colors in common.

Right away, I knew that I wanted to break out my armadillo cookie cutter (I mean, how often do you get an opportunity to make armadillos? Thank you, Terri!), AND I remembered some fabulous bluebonnet cookies made by Jennifer, an incredibly talented local cookie decorator.

texas armadillos center photo texasarmadilloscenter.jpg
{This little guy may be my favorite cookie EVER. I'm not sure what that says about me.}

texas bluebonnets side photo texasbluebonnetsside.jpg
To make armadillo and bluebonnet cookies, you'll need:
  • sugar cookies cut with an armadillo cookie cutter and another cutter with a cone shape, I used the gnome cutter, but a Christmas tree also works
  • royal icing, divided and tinted with AmeriColor Super Black, Bright White, Royal Blue & Leaf Green
  • disposable icing bags
  • coupler and tips: #2, #1
  • squeeze bottles 
  • toothpicks
  • green food coloring pen
texas armadillos and bluebonnets outline photo texasarmadillosandbluebonnetsoutline.jpg
Outline the cookies in black using a #2 tip.  Because we're using black icing, let it dry for an hour before filling.

Make a two shades of grey icing using black food coloring. Thin the all of the icings, except black, with water, a bit at a time, stirring with a silicone spatula, until it is the consistency of a thick syrup.  (Reserve some of the blue icing for piping details later.) You'll want to drop a "ribbon" of icing back into the bowl and have it disappear in a count of "one thousand one, one thousand two." Four is too thick, one is too thin.  Count of 2-3 is good.  Cover with a damp dishcloth and let sit for several minutes.

Stir gently with a silicone spatula to pop and large air bubbles that have formed.  Pour into squeeze bottles as needed.

texas armadillos flood photo texasarmadillosflood.jpg
For the armadillos, flood the entire cookie with the darker shade of grey icing, working 6-8 cookies at a time.  Come back to the first cookie flooded and add lines and dots with the thinned lighter shade.  Let the cookies dry at least one hour, then add eyes and a mouth with black icing, using a #1 tip.

texas bluebonnets flood photo texasbluebonnetsdetail.jpg
For the bluebonnets, working 6-8 cookies at a time, fill in the top petals with white and the rest with blue icing.  Starting with the first cookie filled, drop small dots of thinned white icing at the top of each petal.  Place a toothpick in the center of each white dot and pull down.  Do not wipe the toothpick off between pulls...you want a bit of blue icing on the toothpick.

Flood the leaves with green icing.

Let the cookies dry, uncovered, 6-8 hours or overnight.
texas bluebonnets leaf photo texasbluebonnetsleaf.jpg
The next day, use a green food coloring pen to add variegation to the leaves.

texas bluebonnets set photo texasbluebonnetsset.jpg
In the next post, the rest of the Texas cookies.  See y'all then!
{update: Here's part two.}


30 comments:

  1. These are so cute! You amaze me every time I visit your site!

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  2. Goodness Bridget, every time I think one of your cookies is the cutest I've ever seen, the next ones get even more precious!!! These Texas cookies are AMAZING!!! Oh and Little Buddy is gonna flip when I tell him who you made these for - HUGE fan of his!!! Too cool!!! xoxo

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  3. Those bluebonnets are so cute. And so are the armadillos! Okay, everything is super cute. I don't know how you manage making everything so darned adorable. And I just read the Jim Parsons post. How fun! Woohoo for Texans. :)

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  4. I've always loved when you outline your cookies in black! These look super! Can't wait to see how you did the state of Texas cookie. I'll be waiting for part deux :)
    Renee - Kudos Kitchen

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  5. Those armadillo cookies are just to cute to eat!!!

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  6. As a Texan I just have to say YES!!! These are awesome!

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  7. Olá...
    Que aspecto divinal :)..... Hoje foi a primeira vez que vim aqui ao teu blog e adorei ;).... Já sou seguidora :D.... Beijocas...


    http://nacozinhadaleonor.blogspot.pt/

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  8. Kim -
    I love these! I'm a displaced Texan and always long to see a field of bluebonnets!

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  9. This is such a great set, Bridget! And I gotta agree with you about he black icing... it really make the colors pop. Plus, there is less mixing of icing colors if you only need one color in outline consistency. I hope the Texas map cookie is in Part 2. I'm anxious to see how you made those!

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  10. Thanks for the tutorial Brigitte. Since I live in California and armadillos and bluebonnets are not on my horizon -- I am looking forward to "how-to" do the map of the state. Thanks!

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  11. Yay for Texas cookies! I love my state & these yummies!

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  12. giddy up! love our state!!! loved the bluebonnet cookies!

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  13. As a native Texan, you go girl! These are adorable! I don't believe I've ever seen bluebonnet cookies. Well, armadillo's either to be honest. :) You are so talented! I know whoever receives them will be thrilled ~

    Pat

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  14. Love the Texas cookies. We lived in San Antonio for 10 years and really miss Texas. We do visit since our son still lives in SA. Texas is ..... well... Texas. What else can be said? Y'all used to be your own county, right? Oh, since I am originally from Alabama, the y'all works for me, too. As soon as I retire, we are headin' to Tejas, y'all.

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  15. Those armadillos are SO cute!!!!

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  16. Hi Bridget! I'm so THRILLED that my bluebonnet cookies inspired yours!!!!!! They turned out FABULOUS!!!! Your whole Texas set is simply wonderful and I love the map and your darling little armadillo...I think I'll have to track down one of those cutters too! What a cool thing that you got to make cookies for "Sheldon Cooper"!!!!!!!! Lucky you!!!!!

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  17. Perfect timing! I have been looking for bluebonnet inspiration! Thanks for sharing!

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  18. Have been looking for a terrific cut-out cookie recipe for years. Perfect. Like you said: the cookie takes center stage. Love you blog.

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    ReplyDelete
  20. I rarely leave responses, however after reading through some of the comments
    on "How-to Texas Cookies : part one". I do have a few questions for you if you do not
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  21. To make them gluten-free, substitute oat flour for the all-purpose flour and make sure that your oats are labeled gluten free. You can also add raisins, walnuts or butterscotch chips to your oatmeal cookie recipe.

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  22. I like the valuable information you provide in your articles.

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  23. These are the best looking cookies I have EVER seen!
    ~ Michelle

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  24. The cookies are adorable!! They look so perfectly decorated! Thank you for this wonderful idea.

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  25. You never EVER cease to amaze me! These are so darling I CAN'T STAND IT!!!!! *Love*.

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  26. So cute! I love the map one and the armadillo!

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  27. I am in love! We are missionaries in Ecuador and there are just days when I miss Texas. These cookies are amazing and make me a little home-sick. I do have a Texas cutter, so I am going to put on some good Texas Country music, use the word "ya'll", head to the kitchen and use your inspiration! Then, of course, I will have to explain to everyone what shape they are eating, but it will be a geography lesson!
    Thanks

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  28. HI. LOVE YOUR WORK. CAN YOU PLEASE HELP ME ON HOW TO GET THIS BRIGHT BLUE COLOR. i HAVE ONLY WILTON COLORS.MANY THANKS.

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